Rather than edit my Gio Hat pattern post again, I’m adding this as a new post.

I’ve been out most of the day, so vegged out all evening, finishing up a book (Dean Koontz’ 77 Shadow Street) and messing around with Facebook and Ravelry. However a day without even a sniff of yarn is just not right, so I picked up the failed flower that I made the other day, unravelled it, and made another. Here’s what I did…

Make a magic circle, ch1, 5sc into circle. Don’t join, keep going in a spiral, make 3sc into each of the 5sc. Fasten off, thread the yarn tail onto a large-eyed needle, push the needle through somewhere in the centre of the flower to encourage it to spiral a bit. Fasten off and weave in both yarn tails. Use a thinner yarn to sew a 1-inch button to the back.

And hey presto, abracadabra, higgledly piggledy, you now have a detachable flower for the hat that can be positioned wherever you like.

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I was going to name this Zoom or Snappy but there are too many patterns with those words in the names on Ravelry. So I am calling it the Gio Hat (pronounced Jee-Oh) because there are only nine rounds and Gio means nine in Mandarin.

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This is a very basic hat but I am assuming you have some crochet experience and I don’t have to explain everything to the letter.

Crochet hat with peak

Super bulky yarn (6 on yarn label)
I used Loops and Threads Zoomba – it’s a 114 yard ball, and I used approximately 65 yards
10mm crochet hook
Gauge 6sts to 4″
(The best way to check gauge is to work the first three rounds. The resulting circle should measure 6″ in diameter.)
To fit head 22-23″ in circumference, measured over ears

Abbreviations:
Ss slipstitch
Ch chain
Dc double crochet (treble in UK)
Hdc half double crochet (half treble in UK)
Sc single crochet (double in UK)
St stitch
Rnd round
Rep repeat

Rnd 1: Start with a magic circle, ch3, 10dc into ring, ss to top of ch3 to join (11 sts)

Rnd 2: Ch3, dc into same place as ss, 2dc into each dc around, ss to top of ch3 to join (22 sts)

Rnd 3: Ch3, dc into same place as ss, 1dc into next st, (2dc into next st, 1dc into next st), rep instructions in brackets around, ss in top of ch3 to join (33 sts)

Three rounds complete, diameter of work is 6″ for crown

Rnd 4: Ch3, dc into next and every st around, ss to join (33 sts)

Rep rnd 4 until a total of 9 rnds are complete. Hat is approx 8″ deep from magic circle to edge.
Ch1 and fasten off.

Peak: lay hat flat with end of rnds at back, working edge at top
Mark centre 13 sts (or just start crocheting about three sts in from the right hand end)

Join yarn in marked st on right, ch1, sc into same st, hdc into front loops of following 11 sts, sc into marked st, ch2, turn (13 sts)

Using hdc, dec over next two sts,* hdc to last two sts, dec again, ch1 and fasten off

Weave in ends.

*decreasing with hdc
Wrap yarn around hook, insert through stitch, pull up a loop – three loops on hook
Wrap yarn around hook again, insert through next stitch, pull up another loop – five loops on hook
Wrap yarn around hook, pull through all five loops on hook

Bonus baby version:
I referred to bobwilson123’s hat sizing guide which tells me that a 14″ circumference hat will fit a 0-3 month old baby. It also says I should make it 5.5 – 6″ deep.

Accordingly, my tweaks to the above pattern are as follows:
Only work the first round plus one increase round (the one where you work two stitches into each dc all the way around) for the crown. Then work straight for a total depth of 6 rounds. Mine is about 5.5″ deep.
Peak – worked over 8 sts instead of 13. Only one row.
In other words, join yarn in an edge st, ch1, sc in same st
Sc6 in front loop only
Sc1, fasten off

Yardage used: about 35 yards

Gio Baby

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Bonus flower for Gio Baby:
See later blog post – link here.

This yarn is appropriately named. Zoomba makes projects zoom!
I made two more of these hats tonight, the red colourway is called Wild Fire and the purple is Passion.
I have my design notes written out on my iPad so I think I shall publish it. It’s great if you want a 1-hour hat!
I will make a new post with the pattern soon.

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Another new design, hot off the hook, though it’s not very imaginative. Just a double crochet (treble UK) hat with a bit of a peak.

I originally started knitting one, thinking of a simple cabled hat, but it wasn’t going well so I deferred to the hook.

This yarn is Loops and Threads Zoomba, a super bulky weight acrylic. I used a 10mm hook so this was a really quick hat.

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I bought three colours of this yarn. This one is bright pink and is called Snappy – the others are purple and red.

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And just for fun, here are the fabrics I bought yesterday at Fabricland’s closeout sale.

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I am sharing this here partly as a way to keep the information in a separate location from my Mac and partly to add this to my sidebar of free patterns for your enjoyment. I created and wrote out two really basic patterns last night to use in my new Learn to Knit and Learn to Crochet kits for the market table. The knitted one comes first; scroll down for the crocheted one.

 KNIT FINGERLESS MITTSknitmitts

Your first project – somewhat smaller and quicker than a scarf for learning some of the basics

100grams/3.5oz bulky weight yarn (number 5 on yarn label)

#10 US/6mm knitting needles

Large-eyed yarn needle for seaming

Scissors

Tape measure or ruler

 

 

**How to knit the knit stitch **

Insert the tip of your right needle into the first stitch on your left needle. Wrap the yarn counter-clockwise around the right needle tip. While maintaining a reasonable tension on the yarn, use the right needle tip to pull the yarn loop through the stitch. You have now made a new stitch. Let the old stitch drop off the left needle tip. 

Make a slipknot about three feet from the end of the yarn. Place on needle. Use Long Tail cast on method to cast on 22 stitches, for a total of 23 including slipknot. Keep your stitches snug on the needle but not too tight.

Knit each stitch of first row, trying to stay relaxed and not work too tightly or too loosely.

Turn work, and continue to knit every stitch of every row. After a couple of inches, measure the width of your knitting. It should be around 6.5” from side to side. Gauge is not critical for this project, but it is worth practising how to measure. Use a ruler or tape measure to find 4” of stitches across one row (a series of little eyebrows), not including edge stitches. Count how many in 4”. This is your gauge. Mine was 13.5 stitches to 4″.

Keep knitting every stitch of every row until you have worked about 6” from the cast on edge. Work an even number of rows so that when you bind off you will end up with the yarn tail on the top left corner of the rectangle, and the beginning yarn tail on the bottom right, so that seaming will be easy.

Bind off, cut yarn leaving a 12” tail, pull tail through the last stitch and tighten.

Fold the rectangle so that the cast on and bind off edges match up. Working from the public side (outside of mitt, also known as the Right Side) use mattress stitch and a large-eyed yarn needle threaded with the yarn tail to join edges together part way. Do the same at the other end.

Try mitt on to see if hole for thumb is right size. When you are happy with the fit, fasten off with a knot and weave in the ends on the inside. Never cut the yarn near the knot, always run it through the back of your work for a couple of inches, then turn and repeat in the other direction before cutting carefully.

Important note about gauge

When size matters, in other words you are making something to fit properly, you need to make a gauge swatch. This should be at least 6″ square and ideally should be washed and dried in the way that you will treat the finished garment. Then measure 4″ of stitches and rows in the centre of the swatch. In garter stitch, which is what you are making here, count the ‘eyebrows’ for stitches. When it comes to rows, you must count the raised ridges and the valleys between the ridges. One ridge represents two rows for easy counting.

Important note #2 about ease

Some things that you make will need to have positive ease. This just means that you usually make a sweater a few inches bigger around than your actual body measurement because you don’t want it to be skintight! In the case of these mitts, we are using negative ease. For an adult woman’s hand that measures about 7.5” around, we are creating a piece that measures less so that it will stretch to fit. This ensures that it will stay on when worn. This rule would also apply to a hat. 

Copyright for this pattern belongs to Nicola Newington. I am happy for you to share it with others, but please do not publish it as your own or sell it. You may sell any items that you make with this pattern.

 CROCHET FINGERLESS MITTS

Your first project – socrochetmittsmewhat smaller and quicker than a scarf for learning some of the basics

100grams/3.5oz bulky weight yarn (number 5 on yarn label)

M/13/9mm crochet hook

Large-eyed yarn needle for seaming

Scissors

Tape measure or ruler

 

 

 

**How to single crochet**

Insert hook into stitch, wrap yarn clockwise around hook, pull loop through stitch; you now have two loops on hook; wrap yarn around hook again and pull yarn through two loops on hook.

Make a slipknot about 12 inches from the end of the yarn. Place on hook. Chain 16. Keep your chains fairly loose as you have to work into them on the first row.

Foundation row: Work a single crochet into the second chain from the hook (don’t count the loop that’s on the hook) followed by a single crochet into every chain to the end, trying to stay relaxed and not work too tightly or too loosely. You can work under one strand of each chain stitch, or two, just be consistent.

You now have 15 single crochet stitches. Chain 1, turn work so that the tops of your new stitches (they look like ‘Vs’) are along the top of the strip you just made.

Row 2: Single crochet into each stitch across, inserting your hook under both strands of each V. Count as you go to make sure you make 15 stitches. Chain 1, turn. (Never work into the chain 1 that is your turning chain from the previous row.)

Repeat row 2 a few more times.

After a couple of inches, measure the width of your crochet. It should be about 6.5” from side to side. Gauge is not critical for this project, but it is worth practising how to measure. Use a ruler or tape measure to find 4” of stitches across one row (a series of vertical posts), not including edge stitches. Count how many in 4”. This is your gauge. Mine was 10 stitches to 4”.

Continue repeating row 2 until you have worked about 6” from the cast on edge. Work an even number of rows so that when you finish you end up with the yarn tail on the opposite corner of the rectangle from the beginning yarn tail, so that seaming will be easy.

Fasten off by cutting yarn leaving a 12” tail, pull through the last loop on the hook and tighten.

Fold the rectangle so that the first and last rows match up. Working from the public side (outside of mitt, also known as Right Side) use mattress stitch and a large-eyed yarn needle threaded with the yarn tail to join edges together part way. Do the same at the other end.

Try mitt on to see if hole for thumb is right size. When you are happy with the fit, fasten off with a knot and weave in the ends on the inside. Never cut the yarn near the knot, always run it through the back of your work for a couple of inches, then turn and repeat in the other direction before cutting carefully.

Important note about gauge

When size matters, in other words you are making something to fit properly, you need to make a gauge swatch. This should be at least 6″ square and ideally should be washed and dried in the way that you will treat the finished garment. Then measure 4″ of stitches and rows in the centre of the swatch. In crochet, the vertical posts are stitches. When it comes to rows, you count the horizontal ridges.

Important note #2 about ease

Some things that you make will need to have positive ease. This just means that you make a sweater a few inches bigger around than your actual body measurement because you don’t want it to be skintight! In the case of these mitts, we are using negative ease. For an adult woman’s hand that measures about 7.5 inches around, we are creating a piece that measures less so that it will stretch to fit. This ensures that it will stay on when worn. This rule would also apply to a hat.

Copyright for this pattern belongs to Nicola Newington. I am happy for you to share it with others, but please do not publish it as your own or sell it. You may sell any items that you make with this pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My kerchief is finally being blocked. It joined a load of clothes in the washer and is now being streeeeetched on the mats.

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The other projects I have been working on the last few days are upcycled jeans bags. I bought two pairs of jeans and a pair of denim shorts at one of the local thrift stores. The shorts became this bag with the butterfly lining…

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One pair of jeans has become this bag…

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And the legs are destined to become yoga mat bags. One leg already has fabric added to the top and bottom, but I need to get some sort of cord for the carrying handle and think up a cute embellishment.

I’m doing a different event in a couple of weeks which I am optimistic about. It’ll be a new audience who will hopefully like what I make.

Hope you have a great week!

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